Alopecia Areata: Pathology

Alopecia Areata: Pathology

|Client: Prof. Shelley Wall, Dr. John Wong

|Format: 11 x 17″ Magazine Spread

|Audience: general, popular science

|Tools: Photoshop, Illustrator

Lessons Learned: pathological illustration, color theory, layout, image texturing

Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disease. Current research has further defined AA’s molecular mechanism and created new treatment targets. Existing visualizations fail to explain these new interventions to a general audience because: (1) oversimplification of the hair microanatomy—few hair cycle illustrations clearly differentiate hair structure such as “hair follicle” and “hair shaft”, preventing the audience from accurately pinpointing the AA immune targets (even if these structures were included, they are typically removed from the context of the AA hair cycle);  (2) all existing visualization explains the hair cycle and immune response as separate entities, creating a disconnect between the hair growth dynamics and the molecular mechanism. This two-page spread bridges these communication gaps through a comparison of AA scalp and normal scalp at the gross, cellular, and molecular levels in order to provide a comprehensive picture of this complex disease.

Process work coming soon!

The Cortex and The Brainstem

The Cortex and The Brainstem

|Client: Prof. Dave Mazierski, Prof. Shelley Wall

|Format: 8.5 x 11” Poster

|Audience: Neuroanatomy students, undergraduate level

|Tools: Photoshop, Illustrator

Lessons Learned: perspective, maquette usage, photoshop paint texturing

Ventral Lateral View of the Brainstem

A ventral-lateral view of the brain is rarely seen in textbooks and atlases. Other than its scarcity in undergraduate anatomy education, I depicted the brain from this unique perspective because, not only does this view showcase the relationship of the cranial nerves to the external features of the brainstem, it also clarifies how parts of the brainstem connect with the diencephalon and the telencephalon. I based the sketch on brain serial dissections from Grant’s museum, a Somso brain model, and a maquette made from MRI images from BodyParts3D. To enhance the interconnectedness between the subcortical structures and external macrostructures, which are essential for understanding the optic and pyramidal pathways, I removed the right occipital lobe and the insula to reveal footprints of association bundles, the projection fibers, parts of the corona radiata, and the contour of the lateral ventricle.